Comic Book Reviews for This Week: 7/21/2021

As we’re getting close to the end of the summer season, I thought it was time to do a “comic book reviews for this week” post. This week’s reviews are for the week of July 21st, 2021.

This week, there are comics from Image Comics, Dark Horse, Marvel, DC, IDW, Dynamite and Boom. There are also movies from Action, Adventure, Biography, Comedy, Crime and Drama.

At the moment, the comic book world is experiencing a similar situation to the movie world, where Marvel is reeling from a number of negative developments. The most recent is the loss of top writer Brian Michael Bendis, who is leaving in order to work full-time on his creator-owned projects. This is the second major writer to leave Marvel this year, after the close of Brian Bendis’ Avengers: Illuminati series. Top artist Alex Maleev also left the company, and the series he was working on has been cancelled.

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This week’s comic book reviews are here! Almost everything that was published today has been read and reviewed by the team. It isn’t exhaustive, but it covers almost everything from DC and Marvel, as well as major titles from Image, Boom, IDW, Scout, Aftershock, and other publishers.

Longform individual evaluations for major problems are usually complemented in part by the review blurbs included below. Moon Knight #1, Superman and the Authority #1, and Dark Blood #1 are among the titles released this week.

In case you were wondering, our ratings are straightforward: we assign a single number out of five; that’s all! If you’d like to see our past reviews, you can find them all here.

DC #1

Comic Reviews - Superman and the Authority #1(Photo courtesy of DC Entertainment)

Blue & Gold is a new limited series that reunites the popular duo of Blue Beetle and Booster Gold for another adventure that mixes shameless fame-seeking and genuine superheroes. Written by Booster Gold creator Dan Jurgens and excellently illustrated by Ryan Sook, the book feels very much like a “back to basics” approach that frames the two heroes in familiar roles. Booster is back to being obnoxious and seemingly more concerned about fame than actually helping people, while Beetle is depicted as a somewhat cash-strapped super-genius who places friendship over acknowledgement. While the opening issue doesn’t break any new ground with characterization, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. These two heroes have had such a…weird time of things over the past 15 or so years, I’m perfectly content with this being a “replay the hits” sort of comic as long as we get some a quality superhero arc. This is a fun opening chapter to what should be a solid superhero series. — Christian Hoffer

4 out of 5 stars

In this issue, Selina’s continuing battle to preserve Villa Hermosa reaches an interesting—and significant—climax. Catwoman tries to negotiate a new status quo with the aid of her motley crew of wards, as well as a slew of other DC Comics villains too shocking to reveal here, just as Father Valley reappears to wreak tremendous havoc. Ram V manages to keep an ensemble that’s fairly complex in an intriguing manner, and my only complaint is that I’d want to see him use a couple of the issue’s characters more. Fernando Blanco’s work is as dynamic and elegant as ever, while still providing some important context. This arc has the potential to be one of the best in the series. Jenna Anderson says:


4.5 out of 5 stars

With Wally West now in the driver’s seat while Barry explores the universe, it seems as though DC has taken a backseat and returned us to Wally’s pre-New 52 period, complete with family. The majority of the issue is dedicated to Wally trying to find a new job since he can no longer be the Flash 24 hours a day, and although it’s an intriguing concept, it’s handled in a manner that’s a little too fast and unsatisfying with a superhuman help. Wally’s new position as the Flash is intriguing, but the Scarlet Speedster could stand to slow down a little. Valentine, Evan

3 out of 5 stars

“United Order” has been a bit of a mixed bag, and although it hasn’t been as gripping as the last arc, there have been certain parts that I’ve really liked. The interactions between the team as they attempt to take down Synmar are just as delightful as ever, including some stellar points between Batman and Aquaman, Hawkgirl and everyone, the Wonder Twins (yes, the Wonder Twins! ), and Green Arrow and Black Canary, though the latter is on their own adventure elsewhere. The interaction between Naomi and the Justice League Dark is the highlight of the book, and I could have read a whole issue just on that one page alone. Speaking of JL Dark, I was enthralled by every page of part two of “The Eternal Knight,” and Elnara and Batman remain one of my favorite new couples. The twists are intriguing, the action is fast-paced, the artwork is fantastic, and that final page is pure gold, and I’m looking forward to the next episode. Although there are aspects of Justice League that elevate everything else, JL Dark alone is worth the price of admission. Matthew Aguilar (Matthew Aguilar)

3.5 out of 5 stars

After a few issues of up-front, rough-and-tumble action, it’s all put on hold in favor of a family drama. Nightwing #82 provides the required exposition that ties up the loose ends following last issue’s big cliffhanger, but it does dampen all the steam the narrative had been building over the previous several months. Things are still going ahead, although at a considerably slower pace than in previous issues. This isn’t necessarily a negative thing; it’s just a change of pace that will assist to keep the novel interesting. Adam Barnhardt’s remark

4 out of 5 stars

Billy Batson’s power to transform into Shazam has been taken away by the events of Infinite Frontier, and the rest of his life is crumbling around him. Even if you aren’t familiar with Teen Titans Academy or the larger current DC storylines, Shazam #1 is a delightful little first issue. Tim Sheridan’s performance as Batson is excellent, capturing his anger without making him seem like a whining adolescent. Miguel Montez from the acclaimed Dial H for Hero series is also returning, and he’s as funny as ever. Casey, Connor

4 out of 5 stars

There will be a lot of acclaim for Supergirl: Woman of Tomorrow #2, and it’s well-deserved when it comes to Bilquis Evely’s art—and maybe even more so when it comes to Matheus Lopes’ colors. This issue is visually amazing, with exquisite details and a vibrancy that conveys a tale that words alone cannot. In terms of Tom King’s tale, there’s some beautiful writing in there as well. In this issue, Supergirl and Ruthye travel via what seems to be a space bus, presumably in pursuit of Krem, and King has done an excellent job of giving Ruthye a distinct voice. However, it drags down the issue in a weird kind of didactic piece of narrative about stinky aliens, poor hygiene, and a lengthy trip as Ruthye gracefully “gee whiz” retells her experiences with the Maid of Might. In this issue, not much occurs, but we do appear to receive an explanation about Krypto’s destiny. Because, as much as King has grown and understood Ruthye, one can’t help but sense that he doesn’t know Kara at all, resulting in this issue being a weird clash of perfect art with less spectacular text. Nicole Drum is a writer.

3.5 out of 5 stars

Superman and the Authority acts as an abstract and introduction to the dissertation that follows, and it raises expectations. Morrison is ideally positioned to comment on both Western comics’ unmet promises and Western politics, and he does it in a fascinating manner throughout this debut issue. They, together with an already outstanding creative team, turn a longform discussion on ideas into fantastic comics and heroic drama, producing some of their finest work to yet. It’s a good start, but it only succeeds in the sense that it sets the stage for a meaningful ending. — Magnett, Chase

4 out of 5 stars

When it comes to collections like Red and Blue, a single 8-page tale in one issue is enough to send a reader to tears, so it’s quite a feat when one issue accomplishes it several times. “Fetch” is a dog tale that captures the pure pleasure of a child seeing his dog for the first time in some really joyful panels, while devoting considerable speech to clarify what is obviously apparent. Smart, insightful, and wonderfully drawn, “De-Escalation” is the kind of low-stakes tale that stays with you far longer than a fight with Mongul or Metallo. “Your Favorite” is sure to make readers grin, and it wonderfully portrays Jimmy Olsen’s charm. “Red Son… Blue Dot” is a classic retelling, but it has three excellent spreads that showcase Mark Buckingham’s full brilliance. The last tale, “Generations,” by Daniel Warren Johnson, is a true classic for comic book readers and Superman enthusiasts alike. Following a short introduction, a pattern of words and panels creates meaning via repetition and identification of pictures. Because words just aren’t adequate to convey the infinite intricacies of unselfish love, Johnson trusts readers to realize how massive the ideas he’s describing on the page are—yet that’s precisely what Warren’s artwork accomplishes throughout 8 beautiful, sometimes subtle, pages. It’s the kind of comic that makes you want to say “thank you” as a reader. — Magnett, Chase

5 out of 5 stars

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Marvel #1

Aliens #5 tells the story of the Cruz family’s previous traumas and how Gabriel’s devotion to Weyland-Yutani is to blame for their gradual suffering and sacrifice; it’s a terrible issue on many levels. Whereas previous issues tried to make their protagonist likeable, the final chapter of this initial arc acknowledges the patriarch’s and his employer’s heinous acts. Several aspects are so gruesome that they border on becoming agony porn. While this is in keeping with the Aliens series, it is presented here with little purpose or context, as if suffering is the goal. Aliens #5 even contradicts the franchise’s overall criticism of corporate callousness and capitalist slaughter by implying that any organization, regardless of philosophy or politics, would do the same kinds of evil if they had a xenomorph. It’s the kind of nihilism that only seems unique or remarkable when first reading Camus in high school. What’s worse is the look of each xenomorph on the page, as Salvador Larroca doesn’t stop at undercutting Geiger’s frightening design with shoddy tracing methods; he also adds superfluous horns and textures, turning the xenomorphs into comic creatures. All of the issues that were present in Aliens #1 have not only proved to be major faults, but have also proceeded to deteriorate throughout this story—impossible it’s to identify any aspects in these pages that might be considered salvageable. — Magnett, Chase

1 out of 5 stars

Carol Danvers has had a wild trip recently, but after a spin through the realm of magic, it’s time for the “Strange Magic” conclusion, which fortunately lands perfectly. Kelly Thompson weaves in strands from Captain Marvel’s time in the future, emphasizing the importance Carol places in preventing that future. It not only advances the plot in terms of Ove, but it also provides significant closure in Carol and Rhodey’s relationship, as well as ripple consequences from Carol’s trip with Doctor Strange. Ample reward is coupled with blockbuster artwork by Jacopo Camagni and colorist Espen Grundetjern, and that’s on top of Jamie McKelvie’s inspirational and poignant team-up between Ms. Marvel and Cap, which may have struck me right in the feelings. Okay, yes, it did. “Strange Magic” was a joy to see, and our beloved Captain’s future looks brighter than ever. Matthew Aguilar (Matthew Aguilar)

4 out of 5 stars

Extreme Carnage: Phage is the second installment of the “Extreme Carnage” event, this time focused on Phage, another Life Foundation Symbiote developed in the early 1990s. Phage is soon enslaved by Carnage and makes a hasty retreat towards Andi Benton. Because of the nature of the event, there are a lot of shifting pieces in this comic, and I wasn’t a fan of that. There’s also a startling and violent final page that may irritate certain symbiote lovers. I like Geraldo Sandoval’s art in general; he gives all the symbiotes a cartoony violent dynamic that recalls me a little of Carlos Pacheco’s work. Even yet, there seemed to be a mismatch between the artwork and the narrative at times, making it difficult to follow what was going on in the comic. Fans of Venom and Carnage will love this issue, but I believe that others will wait for a collection to get the whole tale. — Hoffer, Christian

2.5 out of 5 stars

This month’s edition of Gamma Flight is fantastic. It does an amazing job of pushing the narrative along and including excellent character moments all against the background of a combat scene. This is the kind of narrative that fans have come to anticipate from The Immortal Hulk, so it’s nice to see that despite being a spin-off, Gamma Flight isn’t missing a beat. Moving ahead, certain revelations in the last pages have piqued my interest in what may be in store for this series in the future. If you haven’t done so previously, add Gamma Flight to your pull list. Logan Moore’s quote

4.5 out of 5 stars

“The Last Annihilation” begins here, laying the groundwork for Al Ewing’s multi-title master plan, which has been in the works for the last year or more. The premiere itself promises to be a colorful event, combining elements from throughout the Marvel world to create a narrative that is both welcoming and original. Like previous recent Guardians issues, there are a lot of people for the narrative to spend time to, and not everyone gets the attention they deserve. However, Ewing has done a great job of spacing it out from issue to issue, so “The Last Annihilation” may be something spectacular if he keeps it up. Adam Barnhardt’s remark

4 out of 5 stars

This month’s Marauders goes back in time and exposes some long-kept truths, focusing on two important individuals, one of whom is obviously more successful than the other. While Gerry Duggan focuses a lot of the attention on Emma Frost, the Stepford Cuckoos steal the show as they try to “help” Wilhelmina Kensington figure out what’s really bothering her. One of the greatest aspects of the issue is their banter, and Duggan crafts an aura of humanity surrounding her that draws you into her tale and desire for justice. Sebastian Shaw is on the other side, and although I like a good verbal sparring match between Frost and Shaw, Shaw lacks the same degree of empathy, and as a consequence, it doesn’t seem like we’ve progressed much. That could change in future issues if that thread is explored further, but for now, it didn’t have much of an impact on me other than reiterating Shaw’s bad character, which we already knew. It’s a good issue of Marauders, and although it’s not my favorite of the series, it kept me interested. — Aguilar, Matthew

3 out of 5 stars

Saladin Ahmed’s new rendition of “The Clone Saga” comes to a thrilling climax, never repeating what happened in the original narrative from the 1990s but still leaving Miles’ future open to a unique route. The climactic battle between Miles and his evil doppelganger is beautifully rendered by artist Carmen Carnero, but it’s the closing pages, complete with a shocking splash at issue’s conclusion, that will have readers’ pulses racing. Finally, this was a good enough arc that it didn’t require Marvel’s familiarity branding to sell it; it may even be better than the first “Clone Saga” since it didn’t drag on too long. Spencer Perry’s quote

4 out of 5 stars

It’s Jed MacKay and Allesandro Cappuccio’s time at the helm, and after reading Moon Knight #1, I can confidently state that not only is the character in excellent hands, but this series also has all of the elements for a phenomenal Moon Knight run. Moon Knight #1 captures the core of the character and all of the characteristics that distinguish him from his contemporaries, while also extending the character’s mythology and supporting cast in fascinating new ways, and it does it with style and humor. As if that weren’t enough, Cappuccio’s and colorist Rachelle Rosenberg’s beautiful artwork demands your attention on every page. Moon Knight #1 is the only comic book you should purchase this week if you only buy one. Matthew Aguilar (Matthew Aguilar)

5 out of 5 stars

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Marvel #2

Comic Reviews - Moon Knight #1 2021(Image courtesy of Marvel Entertainment)

New Mutants has remained the X-Men series that has done the most to explore what life is like for the mutants of Krakoa, particularly those who aren’t as readily able to come and go from the human world as others, and who suffer more specialized kinds of prejudice even in the new mutant paradise. Alex Lins’ artwork is crisper than regular artist Rod Reis’ more impressionistic approach, yet these young figures benefit from their lively, emotive portrayals. Vita Ayala’s writing is as subtle and character-driven as ever, immersing the viewer in these people’ realistic problems with a minimum of melodrama. With an uncomfortable yet emotional ad hoc eulogy and a sudden cliffhanger, the issue finishes a little awkwardly. Still, it’s another fantastic episode of what may be the most underrated series on the X-line. Jamie Lovett’s quote

4.5 out of 5 stars

Reptil continues to amaze me with each issue, and issue #3 is no exception. Again, the relationship between Beto, Eva, and Julian is the motor that propels this book forward, and the novel wouldn’t function without all three of them working together, so if we get more Reptil in the future, they better be included. Terry Blas, the author, does an outstanding job of dealing with important issues like identity and family with a light touch that never seems forced. Meanwhile, the villain gets some much-needed development, and they now seem much more of a danger after this issue, as the stakes for Beto’s family rise even higher. The art duo of Enid Balam and Victor Olazaba continues to shine in the book, filling each scene with bursts of color and an intensity that seems in keeping with the cast’s excitement, and the inventiveness in respect to all of the Dinosaur forms keeps each change feeling new. Reptil is a complete joy to watch, and I’m looking forward to seeing how this all unfolds. Matthew Aguilar (Matthew Aguilar)

4 out of 5 stars

The ideal comic book—perfectly insane—is only a few adjustments away in Savage Avengers #22. Conan remains the main character in this tale, but Duggan rips the lid off the toybox by getting to play with the majority of Marvel’s magical toys. Johnny Blaze, Nightmare, Doctor Strange, and even Shuma-Gorath continue to be present. The script’s pace may be abrupt at times because of Nightmare’s participation in the narrative, but it’s generally a wonderful read. Savage Avengers #22 is a fantastic return to form for this series, thanks to some really amazing art from Pat Zircher. Adam Barnhardt’s remark

4.5 out of 5 stars

This issue shifts the emphasis away from Vader and onto Administrator Moore and her efforts to destroy the Sith Lord, exposing her ties to IG-88 and its assassination attempts on Vader, as well as Moore’s supporters. While she devises a strategy to eliminate Vader, it’s conceivable that this strategy may wind up being precisely what he desires, setting the scene for an unexpected encounter. This book seems more like a supplementary adventure to explain some of the earlier revelations in the book as well as give peeks at what’s to come, serving as a minor departure from the main Darth Vader storyline and “War of the Bounty Hunters” crossover event. It’s undeniably fun, but given that it’s part of a series named after Darth Vader, the fact that it’s veered off course seems a little disappointing. On the other hand, given the quality of prior issues and the possibility of the “War of the Bounty Hunters” event, this is most likely just a one-time occurrence of any narrative momentum stopping and will very certainly prove to be an essential element of the larger tale being told. Cavanaugh, Patrick

3 out of 5 stars

Deva Lompop is proving to be a vital component in the “War of the Bounty Hunters” story, with this book providing light on her past and current adventures with Boba Fett and Jabba the Hutt. Her previous adventures don’t currently serve a significant function in the present event, instead serving as a separate experience that creates the friction between her, Fett, and Jabba, which will most likely play into the narrative’s future. Without a doubt, this issue is enjoyable, but it seems more like a stand-alone experience than anything that directly contributes to War of the Bounty Hunters, which leads to some disappointment. Despite this, the book is fun, bright, and full of action, almost making us wish this was the first issue of a brand-new Deva Lompop series. Cavanaugh, Patrick

3 out of 5 stars

As quickly as possible, get Aaron Kuder on Thor. Kuder creates 2021’s Thor Annual #1 in the style of vintage Marvel annuals, with a self-contained story packed with guest appearances, delectable locations, and new villains, as writer and illustrator (together with inker Cam Smith). The tale revolves on a festival in Alfheim, and Kuder lavishes his pages with vivid images of life among the elves, with almost every early panel bursting with color. Kuder also reminds readers that he has a sharp sense of humour, with many laugh-out-loud moments amid both frivolity and action, many of which are well-focused on Hawkeye. Furthermore, despite the fact that the dispute is limited to a particular topic, the stakes are high. Thor’s awareness of the path not chosen, as well as his enormous obligations, are all made apparent by the current action. Because the hero’s existence is embodied in the events on the page, readers may appreciate him without being told to. Thor Annual #1 is one of the best recent Thor tales, offering fans a vivid glimpse of the Nine Realms as well as a gripping Thor epic that isn’t too expensive. — Magnett, Chase

4 out of 5 stars

In the newest issue of X-Men: Legends, writer Peter David returns to tell a story set between issues #75 and #76 of his X-Factor run in the 1990s. Despite the fact that artist Larry Stroman helped define that run, he’s replaced by Todd Nauck, who doesn’t attempt to mimic Stroman’s style but does use some rough lines and hatching to give the book a 90s feel. The tale follows X-Factor as they appear in court to defend their actions after mutants kidnapped hostages at the Latverian embassy. While not completely depressing, the issue lacks the run’s trademark comedy. Instead, David addresses the notion of employing rebel violence to topple a despotic government in a more serious tone. It’s difficult to predict where David’s tale will fall on the topic without knowing how the story finishes. Meanwhile, it’s fascinating to see David, via Quicksilver’s testimony, put the Avengers and Fantastic Four under the bus, portraying them as political entities ready to utilize bureaucracy to avoid having to weigh in on a contentious issue. The concept, like the rest of X-Men: Legends so far, isn’t compelling enough to warrant the journey back in time, but the execution is so good that hardcore fans and those nostalgic for the period should appreciate it. Jamie Lovett’s quote

3 out of 5 stars

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#1 Other Publishers

While the first edition of Apex Legends: Overtime featured the melancholy Crypto and Revenant, with Mirage providing comedic relief, the second issue has a much more dynamic squad of Lifeline, Octane, Pathfinder, and Bloodhound. It does a good job at exploring scenarios that aren’t only unique encounters that can’t be recreated in the game, but also ones that rely heavily on the characters’ finest qualities outside of their in-game skills. Some catchphrases and Legend-to-Legend interactions are still a little clumsy, but Overtime is building out to be a really genuine Apex Legends tale. Tanner Dedmon (Tanner Dedmon)

4 out of 5 stars

Issue #17, the Ascender series’ final issue, pulls out all the stops. On Dirishu-6, Mother and Tim engage in a magical battle, while Andy, Effie, and their friends also go there. All roads (or planes) lead to Dirishu-6, which has all the ingredients for a decisive battle. There’s a lot going on in this issue as each group rushes to the finish line, but what’s most interesting is that the issue finally begins to pay off on some of the hints about Mila being more than meets the eye that have been dropped along the road. The issue is a high-stakes adventure, and everything in it reflects that. It’s still beautiful, as it has been throughout the series, but it has a new intensity to it. The issue also ends on a surprise cliffhanger, indicating that the last issue will be extremely intriguing. Overall, the penultimate issue is a strong one. Let’s get this party started. Nicole Drum is a writer.

4 out of 5 stars

The first issue of Bermuda didn’t pique my attention all that much. For the most part, the book just introduces the major people who will be engaged, as well as the fundamental issue that these characters will face. What’s here isn’t inherently awful, but I can’t help but feel that more should have been done to assist me integrate into this environment from the start. Bermuda’s tale may have promise in the future, but for now, this first episode hasn’t done anything to persuade me that it will be anything remarkable. Logan Moore’s quote

2 out of 5 stars

Lemire, Yarsky, and the rest of the team are gradually building up to a huge Black Hammer event. The tension in Reborn #2 is particularly apparent due to the simmering narrative that continues to boil up. Skulldigger returns in the most unexpected of ways, as the cover shows, and it’s more than just a cameo—it seems like the character will play a significant part in the narrative as it progresses. The narrative of this novel follows in the footsteps of Lemire’s more conventional works, with several timelines that move back and forth at whim. It’s just a matter of time until something major happens. Adam Barnhardt’s remark

4 out of 5 stars

Depending on who’s in the limelight, Chu #6 is equal parts elegant and sleazy. Saffron performs the most of the hard work for the former, while almost everyone else takes care of the rest, yet the way she handles things helps to balance out what might easily become a horrific tale. With its exaggerated emotions and softened brutality, the new Chu chapter is as excellent a reintroduction to the character as one could wish for, as well as a fresh jumping-on place for what’s to come next. Tanner Dedmon (Tanner Dedmon)

4.5 out of 5 stars

In a world rich with mostly undiscovered ideas and civilizations, Compass #2 retains its tone of archaeological exploration. The invasion of the invading Mongols and the arrival of Druids (obviously imagined based on little historical fact) flood the world around Shahidah with possibilities. There’s no requirement for readers to be familiar with Wales or this period of history, since beliefs, conflicts, and other significant issues of the day (such as leprosy) are organically presented in conversation and action with no need for explicit explanation. As a result, Greenwood has plenty of room to spread out with action scenes that draw readers’ attention across the page. An issue that continues to develop its characters, enhance its environment, and offer enough of mystery and murder for readers to consider seldom makes a mistake. Compass is an exciting journey that, if the rest of the series lives up to the first, may be one of the finest new Image series in 2021. — Magnett, Chase

4 out of 5 stars

Dark Blood, Boom! Studios’ newest series, gets off to a flying start. It’s unusual for a new comic to capture my attention right away. Most of the time, I believe this is due to authors taking too long to get to the heart of their tale and preferring to hide the narrative beneath layers of mystery. While there are still unanswered issues after the first issue of Dark Blood, writer Latoya Morgan wastes no time in laying the groundwork for what this series will become. Logan Moore’s quote

4 out of 5 stars

In a drug-fueled issue of Deadly Class, Wes Craig’s art and Lee Loughridge’s colors take center stage as we learn what happened to Saya since we last saw her. It isn’t a beautiful tale, as are most in this collection, and it seems around midway through that there are only one or two options. With a final-page revelation that appears to set the scene for what Saya would find herself doing at the start of the century, the narrative throws us for a loop. Burlingame, Russ

4 out of 5 stars

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#2 Other Publishers

‘Firefly: All-New’ Verse continues to reassemble the original Serenity cast in more artificial or coincidental ways. This issue centers on a reunion with River Tam, who is now living on an asteroid space station with a kid for unknown reasons. The issue’s first page tries to establish an isolated sci-fi/horror tale mood, but the washed colour detracts from it. In other episodes, the story ramps up the sci-fi for some creative pain, while Emma, facing the loss of her sole family, eventually shows signs of maturation. The narrative beats are all very simple, but they’re done well. Attempts to think outside the box with a few page designs don’t wow, but they also don’t muddle the narrative. For fans of the series, it’s a generally satisfactory issue. Jamie Lovett’s quote

3 out of 5 stars

The odd story of Juan and Gladys continues in the newest issue from Anta and Wieszczyk, as he continues to uncover the extraordinary abilities he has buried inside him. We discover more about Juan’s father in this issue, and we’re also introduced to several new superpowered characters, but the issue seems like it’s spinning its wheels. The antagonists, in particular, are given much too much panel time for what are basically two-dimensional federal agents, and this might have been avoided by giving them more character. Home has become a little stale and is the epitome of a mixed bag. Valentine, Evan

2.5 out of 5 stars

The emphasis of Home Sick Pilots changes once again, divided between two very distinct status quos, each populated by punk rockers and their otherworldly friends. In the same manner that issue #6 established a new foundation for some of the series’ characters, issue #7 does the same, focusing on two characters who seem to have died. In a far more concise re-introduction that simplifies their motivations and trajectories in a beneficial manner, it manages to recap and expand upon what readers learned about the couple over the course of five issues. While the aspects of repetition (or the extremely strange vision of how trains operate in the twenty-first century) may seem regressive at times, there’s no disputing that this comic takes the best of Home Sick Pilots and discards the confusing, unneeded, or just incomprehensible. For new readers, it’s a great second issue, but for those who made it through the first narrative arc, it’s just an acceptable reset. — Magnett, Chase

3.5 out of 5 stars

Killadelphia #15 has the same structure as previous issues, with a three-part narrative that follows the Sangsters (together with Adams) as they cope with a danger on their doorstep, SeeSaw on a spiritual journey in the underworld, and Thomas Jefferson as he prepares for his own power play for America’s destiny. It’s well-written, but it does require careful attention from the reader. The Jefferson story, on the other hand, shines out in this issue, since it draws a lot of attention to the present condition of the globe. Barnes does an amazing job of presenting our actual tale while remaining loyal to the series’ overall storyline. Killadelphia is an excellent and frequently challenging series when it is at its finest. This is without a doubt one of the finest. Nicole Drum is a writer.

5 out of 5 stars

Lunar Ladies is a sci-fi tale about love and treachery that flies ahead. Things go awry when two philosophies collide as readers are exposed to an all-female paradise on the moon. The outcome leaves a princess stranded, while a mad scientist tries her hardest to conquer the moon. Fans will be delighted to join in on this fantastic adventure due to this issue’s sympathetic narration. Megan Peters is a writer.

3 out of 5 stars

I was so taken by M.O.M.: Mother of Madness that I read the first issue twice in one sitting. Maya, a single mother who uses her unusual abilities to become a vigilante, has a sweeping origin narrative in this issue. Anything more would be a disservice to Emilia Clarke and Marguerite Bennett’s storyline, which will surprise you in both clever dialogue and narrative spectacle. The series is made even more lovely by Leila Leiz’s art and Triona Ferrell’s color work, which give a vibrant and dramatic aspect to even the most ordinary of scenes. M.O.M. : Mother of Madness is one of the most entertaining, feminist, and engaging comics I’ve seen recently, and I can’t wait to see where it goes next. Jenna Anderson says:

5 out of 5 stars

The Many Deaths of Laila Starr is down to its last issue, and although every issue thus far has been incredibly excellent, issue #4 manages to raise the standard once again. The anticipated encounter between Laila and Darius occurs in this final issue, but it does not go as the out-of-work deity had planned. We’ve seen Laila experience what it’s like to live, die, and be human through the eyes of non-human or inanimate things in prior issues. These lessons are brought to a climax in this issue, with Laila faced not just by her own selfishness, but also by the effect that every aspect of life has. It’s a lovely development, but it also helps to propel the narrative in yet another intriguing and unexpected path as we near the end. In this issue, Ram V is at his best. This is a work of art. Nicole Drum is a writer.

5 out of 5 stars

After three issues and increasing levels of depravity that contribute nothing to the story, Garth Ennis’ latest book has almost worn out its welcome. Despite the fact that this is characteristic of his work, the absence of genuine human drama makes this one seem lifeless as it progresses. Artist Goran Suduka continues to perform an excellent job with the task at hand, but there are only so many of the same childish jokes in this one until the absence of them elsewhere becomes tiresome and dumb. Spencer Perry’s quote

1.5 out of 5 stars

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#3: Other Publishers

The concept of mixing My Little Pony with Transformers is intrinsically ludicrous, which this last issue of the current miniseries, thankfully, embraces with gusto. Spike and Smolder become unexpected friends with a gang of Dinobots in the first tale, “The Mightiest Dinobot,” a bright and almost ridiculously entertaining adventure that demonstrates how well the mashup idea can work. The issue’s second tale, aptly named “Finale,” pits Transformers and ponies against Sombra, and although it’s practically the polar opposite of the charming and tightly-wound story that came before it, it’s still chock-full of moments that fans of both series will enjoy. Overall, this conclusion demonstrates that there are still ways to amp up the ridiculousness of My Little Pony/Transformers—and hopefully, this isn’t the last time we’ll see it. Jenna Anderson says:

3.5 out of 5 stars

My rule of thumb is that if you harm Yale, my lid will be flipped right away. It’s simply a fact, but the fact that Yale’s character has grown so popular is a tribute to the Power Rangers production team. Ryan Parrott’s art on Trini and Jason has been fantastic throughout this run, but this issue is all about Zack, and his development over the last issue or two has been phenomenal, and it all comes to a climax here. It’s fantastic to watch the character grow in this way, even though Trini and even Drakkon are still evolving. Meanwhile, Francesco Mortarino and Moises Hidalgo collaborate to create beautiful set pieces, with Raul Angulo and Jose Enrique Fernandez adding a rich and bright palette that jumps off the page. You’ve got yourself a winning mix if you provide an intriguing hook for the following issue. Matthew Aguilar (Matthew Aguilar)

4 out of 5 stars

The series’ fifth issue begins with some perplexing opening pages that make you wonder if you missed an issue, but by the halfway point, writer Alex Child and artist Grant Morrison have mostly course-corrected and brought it in for a fine landing (even if the plot clearly takes its cues from Stephen King’s IT in an even more obvious way). Artist Naomi Franquiz, on the other hand, nails the landing the best, giving the series’ monsters and charming protagonists the most memorable aspects of the work. Proctor Valley Road will stand out in Morrison’s bibliography as a one-of-a-kind book. Spencer Perry’s quote

3.5 out of 5 stars

With the faux-Doomsday returning to Earth and the Patron pilots needing to think outside the box to avert it, Orlando and Piazzalunga offer another excellent chapter in this Super-Man story flipped on its head. Project Patron is still one of Aftershock’s best superhero tales to date, comfortably competing with the Big Two’s other titles, and it’ll be fascinating to see how the idea is developed in the future. Valentine, Evan

4 out of 5 stars

Radiant Black has a tendency of defying expectations, and that perfectly describes the situation. In fact, this may be my favorite issue of the series so far, despite the fact that the book’s protagonist is nowhere to be seen. Radiant Red is revealed by Kyle Higgins and Cherish Chen, and although she’s been villainized up until this point, prepare to adore her at the conclusion of the issue. We learn about Satomi’s initial experience with the Radiant and why she used it to steal throughout the issue, and although you know she shouldn’t be robbing banks, you can’t help but sympathize with her predicament. Not just from a financial standpoint, but also from an emotional one, since the rollercoaster journey of her relationship, despite its bizarre times, seems all too real. Darko Lafuente and Miquel Muerto, by the way, knock this issue out of the park on every level, delivering intensity with every line of dialogue and then letting it all fly when things become superpowered. I can’t say enough wonderful things about Radiant Black #6, and I’d be quite content to simply stick with Radiant Red from now on. Matthew Aguilar (Matthew Aguilar)

5 out of 5 stars

When comparing Rick and Morty: Rick’s New Hat to the TV show, I’m still blown away by how accurate the script is. However, I’m beginning to believe that this exact writing might be a better match for television. The fast-paced clever banter of this series is difficult to follow along in the written format, despite the fact that there are still some hilarious moments in this second issue. As a result, reading this comic may be unsettling at times since it jumps around a lot. Even yet, if you’re a big fan of Rick and Morty and the new episodes from Season 5 aren’t satisfying your need for more, this series should. Logan Moore’s quote

2.5 out of 5 stars

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#4 Other Publishers

This week, Save Yourself releases its second issue, which is packed with magical science, a few meet-cutes, and a heartbreaking look at sorrow. Fans will fall for our heroine as she puts her life back together while our heroes discover more about Earth’s role in a cosmic assault. However, when Shawn is abducted by the idols she once adored, viewers will be on pins and needles waiting for more. Megan Peters is a writer.

4 out of 5 stars

The strong societal criticism in Second Coming: Only Begotten Son is one of the film’s major features. This, as well as the study of where business and religion collide, continues in issue #3. Following a catastrophic visit to a religious-themed amusement park last issue (which forced him to escape), this issue finds Jesus having gone viral for his adventures there. It makes the theme park proprietor think of a quick buck. As this plays out, a tale from the Middle Ages plays out as well, one that demonstrates how humanity and greed have always been linked to religion, gently urging the reader to question the validity of what they put their trust—and their money—in. While there is plenty of humor in this book, and it might come off as preaching at times, Mark Russell has managed to make it more thought-provoking than didactic once again. This is an outstanding problem. Nicole Drum is a writer.

5 out of 5 stars

The real fun can begin now that Seven Swords is no longer attempting to hide its gimmick of bringing together renowned literary swashbucklers. Seven Swords features a few entertaining action sequences that are interspersed with snappy banter and the reveal of a wicked plan that is absolutely insane. It’s a great deal of fun. Casey, Connor

4 out of 5 stars

Zadie and her mother’s efforts to reclaim Ricky require them both to demonstrate tremendous strength and discipline with their shadecraft talents, unlocking things inside themselves they never imagined they were capable of. Ricky must conquer his own difficulties in order to reunite with his family, so they aren’t alone in their fight. The finale of this story provides a satisfactory finish to this portion of the trip, leaving things with a satisfying enough closure that it doesn’t need to be extended, while also providing peeks into the family’s future, which is exactly what you want from a story’s last issue. This issue, like the rest of the arc, is dark, scary, optimistic, and delightful, with Zadie likely to win over a legion of Shadecraft admirers. Cavanaugh, Patrick

4 out of 5 stars

The backstories of the characters and other pieces of knowledge begin to rush past at a dizzying pace in this issue of Silver City, which mainly seems like an intermission for what’s to come. While the whole thing is a little overwhelming at times, particularly given we’re just getting to know the series’ strange universe, there’s a sense of flair and passion that makes it all worthwhile. Even at its clunkier parts, Olivia Cuartero-Briggs’ story is lively and emotive, while Luca Merli’s art and colors make even the series’ darkest underbelly appealing. Despite the fact that it seems a bit fragmented in comparison to the other episodes, I’m really eager to see where the narrative goes next. Jenna Anderson says:

3.5 out of 5 stars

As events and relationships established in the Bad Guys miniseries come into play here, Sonic the Hedgehog has been having a lot of fun with his diverse assortment of enemies. Sonic the Hedgehog #42 is mainly concerned with setting up dominoes, with both the Deadly Six and Starline plotting huge schemes and wreaking havoc. There are still a few short action scenes and plenty of comedic highlights, but it’s obvious that the focus in this month’s issue is on getting ready for what’s coming, which includes a continued interest in Belle, the series’ most intriguing new character since landing at IDW. Even though it’s only a waiting game to see what awaits this beautiful location, it’s always a joy to check in with the locals surrounding Emerald Hills. — Magnett, Chase

3.5 out of 5 stars

The world of vampires spends the newest issue from Byrne and Fantini doing a much better job of providing us insight into our lead heroine’s character, but it’s still draped in a vampire world that doesn’t stand out from the many others out there. At this point, I believe the series would benefit greatly if it chose between a black-and-white tale and a full-color one, since the mixing of the two, which occurs often, just does not work as well as it might. Stake has the potential to be more than it is, but it now seems to be spinning its wheels. Valentine, Evan

2 out of 5 stars

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#5 Other Publishers

Comic Reviews - Dark Blood #1(Photo courtesy of Boom Studios)

This sixth issue not only kicks off a new narrative arc, but also takes readers on a trip with people that weren’t in the original story. Older and the IDW crew are putting the “Adventures” portion of their title to good use, which is fantastic news. The Star Wars world is enormous, and the more we understand about the people and events of the High Republic period, the better. Ridgely, Charlie

3.5 out of 5 stars

Syphon is a new Image one-shot that tells a tale that has shadows of previous comics, but stands out due to its art by Jeff Edwards and John Kalisz. This first issue has a lot going on, maybe too much, but it’s a stunning issue to look at, not only because of the colors and line work, but also because of the general manner in which space is utilized. If you want to see how comics can have their own distinct type of art, Syphon is worth checking out. Valentine, Evan

3.5 out of 5 stars

Emmy’s departure from Harrow County caused considerable havoc, with Bernice exposing the extent to which she went to protect both the community and Emmy. However, in Harrow County, the past has a tendency of catching up with the present, culminating in Bernice discovering an unexpected discovery about the Fair Folk. Far less gloomy than previous installments in the Harrow County series, this installment focused on the emotional toll Emmy’s fights with darkness had on the community, particularly Bernice, and how those wounds are some of the most difficult to heal. While it may not be as gruesome as previous games, the title’s charm and atmosphere remain, providing a unique take on the scary franchise. Cavanaugh, Patrick

4 out of 5 stars

This issue of Time Before Time is slower, but it’s also packed with characterisation. Despite the book’s climactic conclusion, the majority of the plot revolves on fleshing out many of the key characters from the series so far, as well as their motives for their actions. These additional facts add to the story’s vitality and make me care more about these people and where they’re going in the future. I’m not sure what will happen in the next episode of Time Before Time, but I’m still enjoying the series so far and continue to recommend that you keep it on your radar. Logan Moore’s quote

4 out of 5 stars

If last month’s Undiscovered Country wasn’t enough of a hint, this issue confirms it: this series has gone full-on meta, and it’s a blast. Even if that meta-ness has a touch of “Deadpool-ness,” there’s still a tight narrative in tow about the advantages and drawbacks of creativity. Snyder and Soule collaborate on a screenplay that explores your imagination and how it can both help and harm you, with the final result being a cautionary tale that makes you ponder and rethink your own personal views. Undiscovered Country is the ideal work of art in this regard, since it helps you feel and analyze your own self. The artwork is still fantastic, and Snyder and Soule are firing on all cylinders in this issue. Adam Barnhardt’s remark

4.5 out of 5 stars

I’ve never thought of Usagi Yojimbo as a hangout comic, but when the mischievous rabbit walks down the road with a new friend, that’s the feeling they give off, and it really fits. Issue #21 continues Usagi and Yamamoto’s meeting with rash sword pupils by revealing their teacher, a renowned swordsman with a vendetta against Usagi and Yamamoto. However, his presence and the gradual build-up to a samurai fight serve mainly as a diversion from the road’s discoveries and pleasures. Yamamoto is a great contrast for Usagi since he has comparable views to Usagi but lacks Usagi’s hard-won knowledge. Even when it’s obvious that danger will find them anyway, they portray a calm, competent, and consistently positive presence in the world. It’s easy to picture reading a dozen issues of the two stumbling from one meeting to the next since, in Sakai’s hands, they’re also entertaining reading companions who offer a world rich in historical locations and lots of action. I expect the trip to finish sooner, but I’ll happily accompany it for as long as it lasts. — Magnett, Chase

4 out of 5 stars

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This week I read an Archie comic where the person who did the art for the cover was largely responsible for the dialogue, so the issue didn’t sound like a typical Archie story. It was an interesting book, but I think I’d prefer to have the art done by somebody else.. Read more about comic news and let us know what you think.

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